Should States call the Shots? by Rick Lamplugh

While many of us celebrate Endangered Species Day on May 18, others attack the Endangered Species Act. Listen to Rick Lamplugh as he discusses whether states should have more or less say in protecting endangered and threatened wildlife. 

 

ENDANGERED SPECIES DAY – MAY 18TH.

While many of us celebrate Endangered Species Day on May 18, others attack the Endangered Species Act. PLEASE listen to Rick Lamplugh as he discusses whether states should have more or less say in protecting endangered and threatened wildlife by clicking the sound track below.   

 

Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Hunt Proposal. PLEASE JOIN the effort to stop this hunt!!

Photo of Grizzly by USFWS

Help Protect Yellowstone’s Grizzly Bears
by Rick Lamplugh, author and wildlife advocate

Wyoming is planning a grizzly bear hunt. Up to 24 grizzlies–including two females–outside Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks could be killed this fall. The Endangered Species Coalition—an organization I respect—is clear about this hunt: “Wyoming’s proposed hunting season and quota is neither cautious nor conservative. Instead, it is reckless and aggressive, and is designed to drive down the population of grizzly bears in Wyoming and prevent them from expanding their range…Wyoming is rushing into an unsustainable grizzly bear hunting season.”

I think that Wyoming should follow Montana’s lead and not hunt grizzlies this year. Montana’s decision makes sense for several reasons. After more than forty years protected by the Endangered Species Act, Yellowstone-area grizzlies were removed less than a year ago. The population is completely isolated from any other grizzly bear population and too small to ensure long-term genetic health. Rather than killing these bears, we should help them recover further. Finally, conservation organizations and tribal groups have challenged the delisting. If they prevail in court, grizzlies will again be protected but that won’t bring back to life any grizzlies killed in Wyoming’s reckless hunt.

Wyoming Game & Fish Department is accepting public comments—from anywhere in the U.S.—until Monday, April 30.

Please join me and The Endangered Species Coalition in urging Wyoming to drop this irresponsible hunting proposal.

Here’s the link: http://bit.ly/2HSw2fh

Thanks for taking action for Yellowstone’s grizzly bears!

Rick Lamplugh writes to protect wildlife and preserve wildlands. His award-winning new book, Deep into Yellowstone: A Year’s Immersion in Grandeur and Controversy, is available signed from Rick at http://bit.ly/2tIEt62, or unsigned on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2tgPU3E. His best seller, In the Temple of Wolves, is available signed at http://bit.ly/1gYghB4, or unsigned on Amazon at http://amzn.to/Jpea9Q. A signed set of both books is available with free shipping at http://bit.ly/2uYTtsU.

Keeping Wolves Alive in Montana – Part 4 by Rick Lamplugh

Keeping Wolves Alive in Montana, Part 4

Here’s a nonlethal deterrence program in Idaho–of all places–that’s a model for protecting livestock while keeping wolves alive, even if a few wolves attack livestock. This is the fourth and final part in a series that looks in depth at how wolves fare in nonlethal deterrence programs.

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Keeping Wolves Alive in Montana, Part 3 – By Rick Lamplugh

Some ranchers in Montana wolf country work to coexist with wolves. State and federal agencies even help them to prevent livestock loss by keeping wolves away. Do they keep wolves alive in the process? This is the third in a series of articles that looks in depth at how wolves fare in some Montana coexistence programs.

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Keeping Wolves Alive in Montana, Part 2: The Blackfoot Challenge By Rick Lamplugh

In this second part of the series Keeping Wolves Alive in Montana, Rick Lamplugh explores a program to keep livestock and wolves alive and separate in a valley filled with both.

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Keeping Wolves Alive in Montana (Part 1) by Rick Lamplugh

Some ranchers in the heart of Montana wolf country work to coexist with wolves, to prevent livestock loss by keeping wolves away. Do they keep wolves alive in the process? This is the first in a series of articles that will look in more depth at keeping wolves alive in Montana.

 

UW study questions effectiveness of killing wolves to protect livestock

Chuck Quirmbach   Wisconsin Public Radio

http://www.superiortelegram.com/news/science-and-nature/4387058-uw-study-questions-effectiveness-killing-wolves-protect-livestock#.WluU_D9_tmI.facebook

Wisconsin researchers issued a paper Wednesday that questions whether governments should kill wolves that are attacking livestock.  Scientists at the Carnivore Coexistence Lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies looked at 230 verified wolf attacks on livestock in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan from 1998 through 2014.

 

The study concludes that in the 31 cases government wildlife specialists killed the so-called “problem wolves” that did not reduce the risk of attacks on livestock more than non-lethal means, such as hazing or scaring wolves, or trapping and relocating them.

Lead author Francisco Santiago-Avila said killing wolves may create an elevated risk of attacks on livestock at neighboring farms.

“And this risk is similar in magnitude to the reduced risk at the initial site. So, the effects offset each other to the point where you get no benefit of killing wolves,” Santiago-Avila said.

He adds that the scientists’ theory is that if a predator wolf is killed, others in the wolf pack disperse, “and when you break that family unit, those wolves may just go for easier prey, and that means livestock in a lot of ways.”

Santiago-Avila recommends governments help farmers make more use of guard dogs to protect livestock, or hang strips of colored fabric on a rope to deter wolves from crossing fences — a technique called fladry.

As long as the gray wolf in the western Great Lakes region is on the federal endangered species list, only government specialists can kill problem wolves.

Santiago-Avila and his graduate studies professor, Adrian Treves, say they regard their conclusions as preliminary. The Little River Band of Ottawa Indians in Michigan collaborated with UW-Madison on the study.

The paper is published in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE.

There’s a LOT to like about Coyotes

Truth be told, I like coyotes as much as I like wolves. Especially after two days in Yellowstone one winter gave me the chance to observe coyotes in the wild. I found that coyotes have qualities that would benefit many people. Here’s what I saw and learned:

 

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Empty-Handed Hunters Can Learn From Wolves – By Rick Lamplugh

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I hear hunters say that we should kill more wolves because wolves take so many elk that hunters come up empty handed. Instead of killing wolves, I think that hunters can learn from them. Here’s how. (photo NPS) Rick Lamplugh writes to protect wildlife and preserve wildlands. His new book, Deep into Yellowstone: A Year’s Immersion in Grandeur and Controversy, is available signed from Rick at bit.ly/2tIEt62, or unsigned on Amazon: amzn.to/2tgPU3E. His best seller, In the Temple of Wolves, is available signed at bit.ly/1gYghB4, or unsigned on Amazon at amzn.to/Jpea9Q.