WDR Presents: A Wolf Called Romeo

WolfDog Radio was proud to have on our show author and friend – Nick Jans.  This is the man who knew and loved Romeo.  I could go on and on..but here him read from his book “A Wolf Called Romeo” and here the story from his own mouth.

ROMEO

I would like share with you an excerpt from a letter Nick Jans wrote to us:
“”I’m currently up in Ambler, my Arctic Eskimo village home of many years, and still my heart. Saw a wild black wolf trotting up a riverbank ablaze with yellow willow, and watched him a long time. Of course it was him. Always is.”

 

 

Romeo is on exhibit now….here are some photos from the exhibit:

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Pictures of Romeo:

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AHS Releases New Canine Heartworm Guidelines

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/massive-animal-sequencing-effort-releases-first-set-of-genomes-64794?utm_campaign=TS_DAILY%20NEWSLETTER_2018&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65926291&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_zG3RAJpOjwR46WM1asOvg01nAEbO_dme-1hgmpDOdTtN0cemJkokIS8nmHrcTbnbun5cEl3HjbQfOXMwlwSt3fwx8BQ&_hsmi=65926291

September 14, 2018. American Veterinarian By Maureen McKinney

Today, the American Heartworm Society (AHS) released a revised version of its highly regarded canine heartworm guidelines—the first update since 2014. Reducing disease transmission, clarifying testing recommendations, and avoiding treatment shortcuts are priorities in the new guidelines. Based on the 2016 Triennial Symposium of the AHS, as well as new research and clinical experience, major changes to the guidelines include the following.

Heartworm Prevention: Use of Mosquito Repellents
According to Dr. Rehm, the incidence of heartworm disease in the United States and its territories rose by 21% between 2013 and 2016. Prevention is the cornerstone of any practice’s heartworm management program, yet compliance continues to be problematic and is believed to be 1 of the key roadblocks to reducing incidence rates.

“Right now, roughly two-thirds of pets are not on prevention,” Dr. Rehm said in a previous interview with American Veterinarian®. “Sometimes I think we take for granted that our clients know more about it or have some more parasite common sense, if you will, than they actually do. And we don’t probe enough to find out where our clients are on the learning curve about parasite prevention.”

RELATED:

Year-round use of macrocyclic lactone (ML) preventives and environmental control of mosquito populations continue to be the basis of prevention, but AHS now recommends the use of Environmental Protection Agency–approved mosquito repellents/ectoparasiticides to control the mosquito vector and reduce heartworm transmission in high-risk areas.

“The use of repellents is not a blanket recommendation, nor should repellents ever be used in place of ML preventives,” Dr. Rehm said. “In regions with relatively low heartworm incidence numbers and few mosquitoes, use of heartworm preventives alone can be sufficient to safeguard patients.”

Heartworm Testing: Putting Heat Treatment in Perspective
heartwormAHS continues to recommend annual heartworm screening for all dogs over 7 months of age with both an antigen and a microfilaria test. Because of the high sensitivity of these tests, however, the guidelines recommend against routine heat treatment of blood samples for heartworm screening because “it is contrary to the label instructions for commonly used in-house tests and may interfere with the accuracy of results of not only heartworm testing but also the results of combination tests that include antibody detection of other infectious agents.”

Instead, the guidelines recommend that veterinarians consider heat treating serum when circulating microfilariae are detected or when active clinical disease is suspected but an antigen test has returned a negative result.

Heartworm Treatment: Use of Non-Arsenical Protocols
While no changes were made regarding the best treatments for canine heartworm, AHS is using the updated guidelines to double-down on its stance that the society’s current protocol remains the best method for successfully and safely treating infected dogs.

“We get questions from veterinarians about the AHS protocol itself, which includes pretreatment with an ML and doxycycline, followed by a month-long waiting period, then 3 doses of melarsomine on days 60, 90 and 91,” Dr. Rehm explained. “Heartworm disease is a complex disease, and there are no shortcuts to appropriate treatment. Skipping any 1 of these steps can affect both the safety and efficacy of heartworm treatment.”

For dogs that are not candidates for melarsomine treatment, Dr. Rehm noted, alternatives such as the non-arsenical combination of moxidectin and doxycycline may be appropriate.  “However, it’s also important for veterinarians to understand that these non-arsenical protocols have serious disadvantages, the most important of which is the length of time required to kill adult worms, during which time heartworm pathology and damage can progress,” he said. “This also greatly increases the length of time the pet needs strict exercise restriction, which is problematic.”

To view the updated guidelines, as well as the AHS feline heartworm guidelines, visit heartwormsociety.org.

WDR PRESENTS: Coexistence with Wolves: Greg Hill and The Wood River Wolf Project

LISTEN NOW!

Join us Tuesday, February 27, 2018 at 9:00 PM for an in depth interview with Greg Hill.   The Wood River Wolf Project (WRWP) is collaborative group of Conservation organizations, ranchers, scientists, federal government agencies and county officials that work together to promote the coexistence of livestock and wolves by proactively using nonlethal measures to prevent depredation.  For more information check out The Wood River Wolf Project (WRWP) website, read, learn….DONATE!

Part of doing “our part” is getting involved – GET INVOLVED, READ, RESEARCH, CALL – BE THERE!

  1. Oversight Hearing on the Status of the Federal Government’s Management of Wolves 
  2. Testimony of Brian S. Bean – “The Status of the Federal Government’s Management of Wolves”

Please take the time to view the presentations listed below – they are not only informative – but critical if wolves are to survive!

How did WDWP get started:

[docupress-document url=’https://drive.google.com/file/d/14-oEPczmc5g1kEV6CcCdM1Ds5oNQZQJN/view?usp=drive_web’/%5D

Nonlethal Deterrents:

[docupress-document url=’https://drive.google.com/file/d/12aZIFLO_efM5HVFkWSKlMhYnwRDI2M09/view?usp=drive_web’/%5D

How does WRWP reach today’s youth?

[docupress-document url=’https://drive.google.com/file/d/11Ta8ko7G4Ud2lZ2kSsa6gd16z47fE3bw/view?usp=drive_web’/%5D

Using Livestock Guardian Dogs:

[docupress-document url=’https://drive.google.com/file/d/1-qisfXOm2IMQb0hSJLyw0wwWeeL2ZWLD/view?usp=drive_web’/%5D

Nonlethal deterrents:

[docupress-document url=’https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_enSrGWwZuRhconX7__fViwu9PDI8xGw/view?usp=drive_web’/%5D

[docupress-document url=’https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XZFQxrN-0pVUe9bJblpNR8hYquP_qhrx/view?usp=drive_web’/%5D

Wolfdog Radio Presents: Community Spotlight Featuring Natasha Hancock – February 13, 2018 9:00 PM (EST)

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Wolfdog Radio Community spotlight shines its light on Natasha Hancock (formerly Woodall).  Natasha will restore your faith in the next generation of wolfdog owners and rescuers.  Natasha is one of those rare people who knew all along what she wanted to do and has focused on attaining that.  

Natasha is the co-founder of the Texas Wolfdog Project and is responsible for the care and enrichment of these animals.  She is an outspoken advocate for ethics in rescue and ownership.  The Texas Wolfdog Project is one of the few wolfdog rescues who actively works with owners to educate and is not an anti-responsible breeding.  Their aim is to help well-cared for animals stay in their own homes!

 

LISTEN NOW!

Replay: Wolfdog Radio Presents – Introduction to the Saarloos Wolfdog with Gerrie Pols and Julie Miyax Bradshaw – 01-30-2018 at 9:00

Due to technical difficulties, portions of the country and other parts of the world were unable to listen to our broadcast, therefore Wolfdog Radio is replaying this most important episode regarding the Saarloos Wolfdog!

Wolfdog Radio is pleased to present an “Introduction to the Saarloos” Wolfdog!  

LISTEN NOW

    Leendert Saarloos (1884-1969) born and raised in Dordrecht (the Netherlands) was a lover of the German Shepherd Dog.  In the 1930’s, he linked a German Sheppard to a she wolf to regain the natural characteristics in this breed. These wolf-dog crossings were called European Wolf dogs. At the end of the 1950s some of these dogs were trained as guidance for blind people. “

 

We are honored to be interviewing Gerrie Pols and Julie Miyax Bradshaw, both involved with Saarloos wolfdogs:   

Gerrie Pols is chairperson of the AVLS Dutch Breed Club of Saarloos Wolfdogs.

“It’s like Saarloos can put a spell on you, that makes you fall in love with them”

http://avls.nl/homepage/
https://silva-amica-saarlooswolfhonden.blogspot.nl/

Julie Miyax Bradshaw, founder and chair of the SWDC (Saarloos Wolfdog Club UK).
“At that time, I was a breeder of Lupine Dogs exclusively…a type of companion wolfdog which encompasses all ethically bred wolflike and wolfdogs. I fell in love with the Saarloos breed!”
http://www.miyax.co.uk/author/julie/

 

Both women continue down a path with an animal that is fiercely disputed, controversial and more rewarding when a bond is forged. Both women have allowed our Wolfdog Radio audience to join them briefly on their journey. 

and of course….the Saarloos…

LISTEN NOW!

Join us Tuesday January 30, 2018 at 9:00 P.M. (EST). 

Wolfdog Radio Presents – Introduction to the Saarloos Wolfdog with Gerrie Pols and Julie Miyax Bradshaw

Wolfdog Radio is pleased to present an “Introduction to the Saarloos” Wolfdog!  

LISTEN NOW – CLICK PLAY

    Leendert Saarloos (1884-1969) born and raised in Dordrecht (the Netherlands) was a lover of the German Shepherd Dog.  In the 1930’s, he linked a German Sheppard to a she wolf to regain the natural characteristics in this breed. These wolf-dog crossings were called European Wolf dogs. At the end of the 1950s some of these dogs were trained as guidance for blind people. “

 

We are honored to be interviewing Gerrie Pols and Julie Miyax Bradshaw, both involved with Saarloos wolfdogs:   

Gerrie Pols is chairperson of the AVLS Dutch Breed Club of Saarloos Wolfdogs.

“It’s like Saarloos can put a spell on you, that makes you fall in love with them”

http://avls.nl/homepage/
https://silva-amica-saarlooswolfhonden.blogspot.nl/

Julie Miyax Bradshaw, founder and chair of the SWDC (Saarloos Wolfdog Club UK).
“At that time, I was a breeder of Lupine Dogs exclusively…a type of companion wolfdog which encompasses all ethically bred wolflike and wolfdogs. I fell in love with the Saarloos breed!”
http://www.miyax.co.uk/author/julie/

 

Both women continue down a path with an animal that is fiercely disputed, controversial and more rewarding when a bond is forged. Both women have allowed our Wolfdog Radio audience to join them briefly on their journey. 

and of course….the Saarloos…

LISTEN NOW!

Join us Tuesday January 16, 2018 at 9:00 P.M. (EST). 

Wolf statue given to school by graduating students for school mascot.

http://www.draperjournal.com/2017/11/03/159190/beloved-wolf-statue-given-to-school-by-graduating-students#.WgHTfJ9yc3I.facebook

This fall, several students pet Koda, their metal-cast statue of their wolf mascot. The statue was a gift from the eighth-grade graduating class last spring.

In the second year graduating classes have given gifts to the school, parent Jen Hymas helped students bring the statue to the school.

“An eighth-grade teacher saw the statue and mentioned it to the students when they were brainstorming ideas,” she said. “When it was decided, I picked it up and brought it to the school. Eventually, it will be cemented and placed in front of the school.”

Channing Hall graduating student Ethan Mouser presented the statue to the school at the commencement exercises. The previous year, the eighth-grade class gave a buddy bench to the school in memory of their classmate Tomas Hollenbach, who died of brain stem glioma, a form of brain cancer.

Channing Hall selected the wolf as its mascot early in the school’s 11-year history, said Heather Shepherd, head of the school.

“Channing is an old French and Anglo-Saxon name that means ‘wisdom,’ ‘wise one’ and ‘young wolf,’” Shepherd said. “Native American mythology regard the wolf as the tribe’s greatest teacher; the forerunner of new knowledge who leaves the tribe to learn and discover and returns to share insight and wisdom. As a natural extension of ‘Channing’ as our school name, the young wolf is our school mascot. The young wolf mascot stands as an enduring symbol of discovery, mastery, insight and wisdom as we foster individuals who are intellectually agile — responding and contributing to a changing world.”

It was during the school’s third year that students nominated names for their mascot. Koda won in a vote over the two other names, she said.

Shepherd said that graduating gifts to the school will become a tradition and credits the school’s parent organization, CHAPS, for making it happen.

“Our students come visit after they graduate but looking at the eighth-grade gifts makes sure they are remembered daily,” she said.