Wisconsin’s Elusive Gray Wolf Deserves Our Protection…

In the late 1970s wolf Recovery in Wisconsin began. The Gray wolf made a comeback after being eradicated through hunting and trapping in Wisconsin. It wasn’t long before hunting special interests groups began their bid to get Wisconsin’s Gray wolf delisted. Sadly after 40 years of recovery these special interests (Fringe hunters) hunting groups got their way. In the state of Wisconsin the Gray wolf is hunted (2012-2014) for a fireplace rug & mounted as trophy when he’s not listed on the Endangered Species List. He was delisted in 2012 and his domestic relative, the dog, was used to track and trail him until a federal judged ordered the Gray wolf back on the ESL in December 2014. Today Wisconsin’s Gray wolf is facing multiple delisting threats in congress backed by special interests; wanting the Gray Wolf’s habitat for oil & gas, lumbering, and the Gray wolf himself for trophy hunting.

Visit Rachel’s blog at http://www.wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com

U.S. House Passes Bill To De-List Wolves From Endangered Species.

We must make it right…get it right…before we lose everything…the wolf is a social animal just like we are…they depend on family for survival…so do we as human-beings…

The idea that only man is equipped for conserving our planet’s natural resources is a dying concept; dying right along with the untold numbers of wild sentient beings killed in the name of conservation. Such problems drive home a critical flaw in the paradigm of conserving wildlife.

It’s going to take a major shift in thinking that will require opening up lines of communication between the general public; specifically with interests in conserving our natural resources for future generations to come. It’s not about numbers. It’s about sentient beings sharing our planet, and how we can coexist for the benefit of all living upon Mother Earth.

Changing the paradigm from killing to compassionate conservation is a major shift in thinking…

Through my mind’s eye memories flow through the years spent within the Gray Wolf’s range in Wisconsin’s northern forests in Douglas county starting in the year 2000. There you’ll find vast wilderness of forests and barrens where the Gray wolf resides.

Do you think there’s room for the Gray wolf? The following video was shot 2 summers ago in 2015. This landscape is found on a 15 mile long remote gravel road in northern Wisconsin. Do you think there’s room for the wolf?

Last summer, 2018, I visited this same area (in the video) with friend Elke Duerr and who’s filming in the photograph.

When I began helping to monitor Wisconsin’s Gray wolf in the year 2000 there were only 66 Gray wolf packs in the state. Today’s wolf over winter wolf population counts is around 945 individuals.

In northern Wisconsin beauty can be found where the Gray wolf resides. I’ve walked these trails for over two decades in search of Wisconsin’s wild & elusive gray wolf.

The Gray wolf in Wisconsin trots freely down the wild and remote gravel roads in Douglas county.

Rains of summer create a lush paradise in wolf range.

The Gray wolf in northern Wisconsin. Photograph screen shot from Red Cliff reservation trail cam.

In summer of July 2018 I met a Raven on a remote gravel road in Douglas county. Douglas county is home for Wisconsin’s wild Gray wolf.

The Gray wolf in Wisconsin deserves our protection…

Contact your members of Congress today.

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Erika Burns Andres

I wanted to repost this from Erika.  She was the best of the community.  I could go on and on about her…but her words are so much more profound.

I have added a recording with Erika from the NLA rendezvous. Again… her words are more profound than any I could write.

Erika Burns Andres – My words:

Experience.

Experience is who we are. It is what makes us, forever teaching and molding us and ruling our view points, and emotions, and our knowledge, and communication skills.

Experience, when learned from, and applied; helps us to become better people in this world if we apply the lessons from the experience, and comprehend the experience.

In my personal journey with wolfdogs and wolfdog community, I have learned that it is a journey of continued learning. This journey occurs online and offline.

I have found it best to stay humble, and try to keep in mind that we are all students. I was a breeder before Facebook times. This made online a peak of the desired education of  the things I wanted to learn further. 

I figured out quick it was going to be an experience to learn from, but  I would have to learn by tuning out the distractions that come with it.

The first Facebook wolfdog I ever saw was (Loki), that belonged to Cindy Matthews. I recall going wow that is one of the best wolfdogs I have ever seen. 

He looked so much like the very first one I saw in my childhood at age 6. The one I saw at age 6 was my first inspiration. However Loki was my first online inspiration. 

Later I recall seeing pictures of (Shango) that belongs to Sharon Green it was love at first site again. My goal was to always breed down in content, then back up.

However, the very first two wolfdogs I saw on Facebook became inspirations for me to try and mold and mimic far as looks. It never happen, but lead me to the very looks so many see today from us. 

I recalled learning why wolf hybrids were now called wolfdogs. We always called them hybrids in the 90’s, the online wdc educated and explained why wolves and dogs do not produce hybrids. 

This took some adjusting to far as using the correct terms. But eventually I settled to be politically correct. I recall thinking to myself , I need to mold my animals like this one or that one. But found I kept getting distracted in education with arguments and unwanted drama being new to Facebook.

So my next focus was, (who do I want to be like and get more of a productive experience) ? And this is not to offend anyone. But I wanted to be like Sharon Green.  She educated , but was never biased, never really took part in drama, or attacks on people. And would ask questions in further learning. This gave me a guide as to what personality is the best way to learn, and still be able to coexist with as many in the wolf dog community as possible. 

Aside from the obvious education, a few things I learned were as follows.

Never assume just because people say something is fact. 

Get to know people on a more personal level.

In most cases, never give up hope that people can change.

Approach is essential to education.

Remain humble, and never be afraid to ask questions.

Educational experience goes better when we educate with genuine concern.

I  try to keep in mind that we don’t truly know others back ground, genetic influences, or life circumstances that influence their thinking or learning process.

I learned to be greatful for any progress fellow owners may venture to make, as humans have free will. They don’ have to do anything or any change. So when we see that change acknowledge it.

I have met so many that have influenced me in my journey of betterment. 

I have met some that are models as to what I do not want to be. And others that I have seen a love, a passion, a logic that serves as all id like to embody.

I have seen so many change for the better, and while I don’t know what changed their heart, aside from gaining a true love for wolfdogs and fellow owners. I can say that I feel education and the experience of the wolfdog community is indeed getting better for new comers to remain unbiased, focused on education, and in turn better in education than those before.

We now have even more to learn. Genetic testing such as Embark, is a new look into wolfdogs that gives insight far deeper than pheno ever could. So once again it is something to have to comprehend and learn more about and expound in education from there. For me it has been a learning experience from the time the wolfdog community began to embrace it. So now I have a mental check list to aide in my experience of the wolfdog community. 

1. Analyse for positive logic and learning.

2. Practice good human relation skills.

3. Find someone who conducts themselves in a way you coincide with to be a positive asset to the wolfdog community, and by example encourages you.

4. Never feel content. As it slows learning and evolving for betterment.

5. Ask questions, and fact check the answers.

6. Have genuine concern.

7. Recognize your gifts and stick to those as we all have various gifts. When we try to go beyond our gifts it can mess up education for others.

8. Learn about wolves and wolfdogs and all the core basic essentials. 

9. Learn from the mistakes of others as well as my own past.

10. Learn about Embark and what it means for wolfdogs, and what it means for previous education and future education. And what it means for a breeder and their breeding program. And learn how it can be a rescues dream come true. For even more informed placement. 

11. Try to keep in mind just as much as we love our animals , try to offer the same genuine love for your fellow humans. Lack of compassion for our own kind is not natural, but should never be limited. I’ve figured out many humans have that issue. But I can’t judge because I really had a pretty good upbringing that taught me to do these things. I do fall short at times for logical reasons.

12. Just because some articulate better than others, it is best to consider the message than the format. Example; If a person says, (wow the stratus clouds look divine). That is wonderful and educated indeed. However; if another member says, ( The thinner clouds are very pretty).  It is the same concept just written in two different formats that say the same thing. Education is not governed by articulation alone, but knowledge. Always consider the facts behind the knowledge, regardless of format.

13. Get to know members on a personal level,it will save a lot of heart break, and you might just make a great friend or two in the process.

I have tried to make all these things into a checklist to be a better member, better educator, better breeder. And a better friend. 

In the process of going by this guide, I have met rescues that were so nice and logical. That care so much about the animals. I have made some really awesome friends along the way as well. I have met many, but I swear I knew Samantha Tambor in a past life. It’s like I went to school with her or something. It’s honestly hard to explain. If anyone can get through to me and make since of things that don’t add up to me, it’s her. 

There are others that have a place in my heart as well. And have helped so much with my education and experience in the wolfdog community. Kim Miles, Jerry Mills, Kat Woldancer, Janice Mcguire, the late Donald Lewis, My customers/friends, Juan Cypress Creek. Bobby B and I use to talk years ago, I actually like him. Though his experience has made him become very reserved. 

Certain people’s drive has also inspired me. Back when there were forums Cindy was like an investigator I learned much from her research. Christa Ward was the first to try and understand my program with breeding lows. And actually made me feel she really was asking for the right reasons. She was the first ever I shared my goals with. 

I was always totally terrified of rescue views. Rescues that changed my mind that rescuers can be logical and have a heart based on logic love and compassion for the animals and people were as follows.

Natasha Handcock
Nancy Brown
Justine T
Sonia S
Connie Howard
John Deboard
Malinda S
Melissa Greene 
Stephanie A
Deborah S
John Smith

There are others as well, but those names come to mind first.

Passion for education is as follows

Greg Largent 
Deanna M
Samantha Tambor
Natasha Handcock
Kim Miles
Jody Haynes
Rose P
Kat Wolfdancer
Richard Vickers
George S
Laura Loft
Stephanie Alcorn

There are so many I can’t name them all. As I continue this journey the above guidelines of learned experience is what has made my journey of experience positive, educational, and perception changers. I hope to continue to learn more, and see us all change for the betterment of each other, the betterment of wolfdogs and the future of wolfdogs. I hope that my place in the community online and offline can be a positive one and others may learn from it. If I could say any meaningful advice, it would be to love equally. The rest will work itself out if that one key factor is truly followed. Forgive equally. The biggest challenge of the wolfdog community is the wolfdog community.  I look forward to the day all can truly see that. 

WOLF WEEK: Wolves to be reintroduced on Lake Superior’s Isle Royale

 

http://www.fox9.com/news/wolf-week-wolves-to-be-reintroduced-on-lake-superiors-isle-royale#

Isle Royale sits like a gem in a cold ring of Lake Superior water some 15 miles off the shore of Grand Portage, Minnesota.  Its isolation has been the island’s preservation. Today, as a national park, the 210-square mile island is not much different than when Norwegian fisherman built the first fish camps on its shores in the mid-1800’s.

A balance between life and death, predator and prey, has kept this island in check since the 1940’s. Ice bridges during the cold winter months enabled the first grey wolves to find the island 75 years ago. Those wolves stayed and, for the most part, flourished, living off the abundant moose population.

Over the decades, the predator and prey populations ebbed and flowed in a forest ecosystem that worked. Scientists studied it, but for the most part, they stayed out of it.

Then, the ice bridges stopped forming and the wolves – after their population peaked at 50 – started dying. Canine parvovirus took many; wolves killing other wolves took some. At times, the wolves were dying at an alarming rate, while the moose, with fewer canines to bring them down, grew in relatively unchecked numbers.

Today, upwards of 2,000 moose roam Isle Royale. With only two non-breeding wolves left to hunt them, the National Park service decided humans will step in and alter the course of nature before it’s too late.

The predator-prey balance on Isle Royale has already clearly changed. For Rolf Peterson, who has spent 50 years of his life out here studying that dynamic, and with the moose population trending up rapidly, doing nothing in this national park would be disastrous for its ecosystem.

Peterson was 22 years old, just a graduate student, when he first stepped foot on Isle Royale. There is not a trail, nor a bit of shoreline he does not know, Now, he is known around the world for his wolf and moose research conducted on the island annually.

No one knows more about the connection between a healthy wolf population, a healthy moose population and a healthy island than Peterson does.

“The main issue here is there’s a moose population that’s like a runaway freight train right now,” Peterson said. “And if we let it run away, it will be to the detriment of the entire national park.”

Had the park service chosen a hands-off approach to the island, Peterson and other biologists believe that runaway moose population would devastate the park’s dominate balsam fir forests. It is the favorite food of moose. Over-grazing means the forests would eventually be replaced with a barren spruce and grass environment, but adding more wolves back into the mix means fewer moose and balance on the island once again.

The decision to drop wolves back on the island did not come easy. It means interrupting the relative “do not touch” scientific philosophy of this particular national park.

Among those with concerns is Dr. David Mech, a premier expert on wolf behavior. Mech pioneered the wolf-moose study on Isle Royale 60 years ago.

“To be done right, it’s going to take quite a bit of thought and consideration,” Mech said.

Mech said he would like to see a committee of wolf and moose biologists thoughtfully and carefully plan the re-introduction.

“Is the primary objective going to be to bring the wolf population to the point where it real quickly stops the moose population from increasing?” Mech said. “Or, is it going to be just establish a basic wolf population out there? Or is it going to be an experiment? I’d like to see it be an experiment.”

Ironically, it was Peterson that Mech helped guide into the prey-predator study and onto Isle Royale in the early 1970’s. Now, almost 50 years later, Peterson has no doubts about reintroduction.

“[Isle Royale] has a future, basically, a future as a dynamic wolf-moose forest system, whereas without wolves here, it had no future,” Peterson said. “It would be just a runaway moose population that would basically trash the place as only a huge herbivore can do.”

With the debate now over, wolves, likely from Minnesota, will once again dominate the food chain on Isle Royale.

“Nature’s way” will start all over again on the island—a delicate balance under the watchful eye of humans, with a new precedent of stepping in when the balance tips one way or the other.

One of Romes rare Italian wolf cubs killed by hit-and-run driver

One of the first wild wolf cubs to be born in Rome in 100 years was run over and killed last week in an incident that a wildlife charity suspects could have been deliberate.

The cub was found lifeless in the Castel di Guido wildlife sanctuary on April 10th, according to the charity that runs it, Lipu, and a post-mortem confirmed that it was killed by blunt force trauma, likely caused by a vehicle.

“Great sorrow for the animal’s death was followed by anger for the evidently non-natural causes of its demise,” Lipu wrote in a statement on Facebook.

The cub, born around a year ago, had a condition that meant it could not use its hind legs. The park’s concealed wildlife cameras filmed it lagging behind the rest of the pack, which never abandoned it despite its disability, Lipu said.

The charity, which has informed the authorities, suspects that a driver may have hit the wolf deliberately.

“It’s hard to believe this was an unintended accident,” its statement said. “It doesn’t seem credible that on a dirt road, where the uneven surface forces you to reduce your speed and yet straight enough that you can see a long way ahead, it wouldn’t be possible to avoid an animal that, due to its physical disability, was moving very slowly.”

Staff didn’t find any skid marks in the mud that would indicate the driver had attempted to swerve, Lipu said.

While the 180-hectare reserve is supposed to be off-limits to all except authorized vehicles, Lipu says that it frequently finds – and reports to the authorities – gates and barriers left open, often when poachers are found to have intruded.

“We cannot exclude the possibility that this time one of these criminals used their car as a hunting weapon instead of a gun, taking out among other things the weakest member of the pack that couldn’t even use escape as its defence.

“It leaves us with great bitterness to see that an incredible effort by the pack, that above all expectations successfully took care of a disabled member of its family, met with on one hand the terrible cruelty of some members of the human species, and on the other the indifference of those responsible for managing such a precious place entrusted to their custody.”

The Castel di Guido had its first wild wolf births in more than a century last year, keeping the litter a secret for months until they were sure of the cubs’ survival.

Wolves are thought to have made their way to the reserve, located to the west of the ring road that surrounds Rome, from the area around Lake Bracciano to the north, which has long had a wolf population.

While the animals are rare in the capital, in recent years they have thrived in more rural parts of Italy, notably the mountainous regions of the Apennines and the Alps.

Their growing numbers have brought them into conflict with farmers, who complain that attacks on livestock have risen sharply. Calls for a cull have so far been met with fierce opposition from environmentalists, who last year blocked a proposal to reduce Italy’s wolf population by five percent.

The European Union will hold a summit on the issue on May 15th, where representatives from South Tyrol and other northern Italian regions will push for greater freedom to manage local wolf populations.

Film Project: Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story

A film that presents the viewer with a complete picture of what it means to advocate for an imperiled species protected within Yellowstone National Park; contrasted against an uncertain future because of wolf hunting taking place just beyond the park’s borders.

“Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy- The Yellowstone Story” tells the stories of people working to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone National Park. A Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin Film. Produced by Rachel Tilseth And Maaike Middleton and Directed by Rachel Tilseth. www.wolvesofdouglascountywisconsin.com for more information. To support the film through a tax free contribution go to www.planb.foundation

Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story is the story of the people that advocate to preserve the legacy of wolves in Yellowstone. In the film; Nathan Varley owner of Yellowstone Wolf Tracker http://www.wolftracker.com/ and president of Bear Creek Council https://www.northernplains.org/our-local-groups/bear-creek-council/. Ilona Popper writer, wolf watcher and member of Bear Creek Council. Rick Lamplugh author and member of Bear Creek Council. Marc Cooke founder of the nonprofit Wolves of the Rockies https://www.wolvesoftherockies.org/. The four wolf advocates have a story to tell. Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story presents the viewer with a complete picture of what it means to advocate for an imperiled species protected within Yellowstone National Park contrasted against an uncertain future because of Trophy wolf hunts taking place beyond the parks borders.

Song credit: Words & Music by Joe De Benedetti & Noah Hill

Inside the Heart of Wolf Advocacy-The Yellowstone Story Documentary Film has a 501 3c fiscal sponsor Plan B Foundation for tax exempt contributions. You can make a donation to support the work of this vital documentary film. Make your donation with Plan B today

Sedona Wolf Week 2018 is less than a week away…

Sedona Wolf Week  April 17th through the 21st at the beautiful Poco Diablo Resort in Sedona, Arizona Registration details www.planb.foundation

Please join Apex Protection Project and Plan B for a week of the most current and in-depth look at wolves in the United States from Grassroots to National organization.

Speakers include  Carter Niemeyer,  Author Nate Blakeslee, KC Your, Rachel Tilseth, Michael Robinson and Marc Cooke

Special events…

• An evening with Nate Blakeslee, author of American Wolf. Admission includes presentation, copy of the book and VIP reception / book signing. Register here.

• Children’s workshop where kids can learn more about wolves and how they are like families, storytelling and interaction with the Apex Ambassador Pack. Register here.

• Predator Friendly®Fundraising Dinner with Carter Niemeyer. Carter was integral to the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone. Carter will entertain you with how he went from a wolf trapper and hunter to becoming one of their most vocal advocates while you enjoy a meal using ingredients from Predator Friendly® farms and ranchers. Register here.

• Wolf Socials with the Apex Ambassador Pack are a once in a lifetime experience and the money raised helps fund the pack’s daily care. Register here.

• Philip Folsom workshop – Wolf Tribe Transformation Program. Register here.

• Films at the Mary D. Fisher are sold separately by the theatre and can be purchased at the door or online at www.SedonaFilmFest.org.

Please note schedule subject to change. The new dates for 2018 are April 17-21st as the event previously scheduled on the 22nd has been postponed

The Speakers

Carter Niemeyer

Carter Niemeyer, Formerly of the Dept. of U.S. Fish & Wildlife where he served as the wolf recovery coordinator for Idaho. As an expert government trapper, he was a key member of the federal wolf reintroduction team in Canada in the mid-1990s. Carter is an Iowa native but adopted the West as his home in the early 1970s. He has two degrees from Iowa State University and is a Wildlife Society certified biologist. In 2010 he wrote his first memoir, Wolfer. His second collection of stories, Wolf Land, published in March 2016.

Niemeyer has been a trapper, hunter, and wildlife proponent his entire life. Wolves, he believes, add to the outdoor experience, and people who see or hear them should consider the experience thrilling. Wolves do not, as many believe, kill everything in sight, destroy their own food supply, or lick their chops at kids waiting at bus stops. They are simply predators like lions and bears, and anyone who believes otherwise is, well, wrong.

Rachel Tilseth

Founder Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin. Rachel holds a Batchelor of Science Degree in Art Education from the University of Wisconsin Stout. Tilseth is an educator living in northwestern Wisconsin. Tilseth’s interests in nature, specifically wolves, led her to advocate for wolves. Rachel will be speaking about Wisconsin’s wild wolf, past, present and future.

in the year 2000 Rachel began working as a volunteer winter wolf tracker for the wolf recovery program.  Rachel spent every spare weekend learning about the wolves and their movements in Douglas county Wisconsin.  It was through that experience she learned to admire and respect the wolf for their strong family values.

In 2011 as wolves in the Great Lakes Region we’re being delisted, and Wisconsin Legislation Act 169 enacted a trophy hunt on wolves Rachel hit the ground running.  She founded the blog and social media network Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin to bring education and awareness to Wisconsin’s wild wolf. She began speaking out against wolf trophy hunts, and is active in working to ban Wolf Hounding in Wisconsin. Wisconsin is the only state the allows the barbaric use of dogs to track and trail wolves in a trophy hunt.  Rachel worked with Senator Fred Risser on Legislation to remove dogs from the wolf hunt. Unfortunately, the bill never left Committee.  Rachel garnered the support of the press and kept up the pressure to hold WI DNR accountable for allowing the barbaric practice of wolf-hounding on an endangered species. Tilseth is working to get Legislation up and going to ban the use of dogs to hunt wolves in Wisconsin.

Tilseth has expanded her interest into filmmaking. She’s currently in the process of creating a documentary film about the heart of wolf advocacy. Rachel believes that story telling through the medium of film, a visual art form, is the next step to advocating for the wolf.

KC York

KC York – Founder/Executive Director

Trap Free Montana, Inc.            

KC has been involved with animals, domestic and wild, since early childhood rescuing, medically assisting, re-homing, relocating, and promoting an understanding and appreciation for them. KC incorporates her formal education in Wildlife Biology and Psychology into her passion. Her advocacy for animals began in her birth place of Florida and continued in Colorado for almost 20 years.

Since moving to Montana in 1998, KC has spent the last 8 years actively involved in exposing and opposing trapping. Growing up with parents that during the harshness of the depression, ranched, hunted, and trapped, as well as those that saved animals, has provided her different perspectives. All, however, were in agreement, trapping is cruel and is unnecessary. At the end of 2013, KC formed a ballot initiative committee, Trap Free Montana Public Lands.

Although shortage of time was the detrimental factor to gathering enough signatures for the 2014 ballot, the overwhelming enthusiasm from the general public was inspiring. This has led to the formation of Trap Free Montana, Inc. a 501(c)(3) nonprofit charitable organization whose mission is to promote the advancement of education, modern day science, and non-lethal alternatives to trapping that foster responsible stewardship and respectful coexistence with wildlife.

Marc Cooke

Founder / Executive Director of Wolves of the Rockies 

Presentation: Attitude of the Rocky Mountain Region towards Wolves

Marc Cooke has served our country in many ways including tours in Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Currently he serves with a nonprofit organization he created—Wolves of the Rockies. Marc had been involved with wolf issues and wolf organizations for over ten years before creating Wolves of the Rockies, which is dedicated to

Apex Protection Project

In 2009, Paula Ficara and Steve Wastell discovered a place that would change the course of their lives forever; a young wolfdog rescue just getting its start in Los Angeles County. With a lifelong love of wildlife, particularly wolves, they found themselves volunteering as much time as possible to the growth and development of the small rescue, eventually leaving their former careers behind to become full-time staff members. In 2014, with their true passion being realized and a strong desire to fulfill their mission, Paula and Steve created Apex Protection Project. Over the past eight years, they’ve helped rescue and rehabilitate over 75 wolves and wolfdogs, developed educational events and programs, and have been active advocates for captive-bred wolves and wolfdogs, as well as wolves in the wild. The goal of Apex Protection Project is to continue the quest of protecting wolves and wolfdogs through educational experiences, rescue, and advocacy with the dream of living in a world where the wolf and all species are highly valued, protected and respected for the balance they bring to the ecosystem and for the gifts they offer to humanity.

Kevin McFee

Arizona Department of Agriculture is a past participant of Sedona Wolf Week’s Co-existence Panel and as a rancher lent significant and positive insight into the challenges of owning a ranch and co-existing with predators. Kevin will focus on discussion on habitat and conservation work he has done as well as the process and the struggles of putting a working landscape together from humble beginnings. Kevin owns his ranch and land, located in Arizona, in proximity to the Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program area.

Joe Engleheart

Rancher, The Working Circle Collaborative. Joe grew up on a small family-run cattle ranch in the interior of British Columbia where he learned at a young age that cattle and predators do and have to live together. After graduating from high school, he worked at many ranches where the owners did not have the same views. This resulted in having to shoot numerous predators. Joe always knew there had to be a better way, but it wasn’t until about 17 years ago he was given the latitude to try some methods that have been successful, such as: upping human presence around the cattle; learning where the wolves are in conjunction with where you are putting cattle; knowing where den sites are; and rendezvous sites are. Every year there are wolves shot, trapped, or snared. This can result in pack dynamics changing, and not always for the better. Through all of this Joe has learned that we are better off letting the wolves be wolves while taking cattle off their opportunity list.

Carol Bogezi

Carol Bogezi is a PhD candidate in the Wildlife Science program in the School of Environment and Forest Sciences (SEFS) at the University of Washington, Seattle. An international student from Uganda, Bogezi was awarded the prestigious Beinecke Africa Wildlife Conservation scholarship by the Wildlife Conservation Society to pursue her graduate studies in the USA, and additional support from SEFS and Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN) for her studies. In 2016 Ms. Bogezi was awarded the 10th annual Environmental Leadership Award by the Bullitt Foundation, and was named one of the ‘Top 40 Women Under 40’ by the Sunday Monitor in Uganda.

Born and raised on a farm in Uganda, Ms. Bogezi is intimately aware of the needs of humans and wildlife competing for natural resources. Her research focuses on understanding interactions between humans and carnivores in Washington State. She aims to contribute to improved carnivore coexistence through (1) analyzing how carnivore movement behaviors influence human-wildlife interactions, and (2) assessing social dimensions of human-carnivore coexistence strategies especially in urbanizing landscapes.  Prior to her studies on human-carnivore interactions, Bogezi studied the distribution and status of a rare crocodile species in Kidepo Valley National Park, northeastern Uganda.

Bogezi believes that the experience and skills that she is acquiring during her study in the USA will enable her to increase the effectiveness of wildlife conservation in Uganda and globally through understanding both wildlife movement behaviors and human behaviors.

Karin Vardaman

Karin Vardaman is part of The Working Circle Collaborative. Founded by the California Wolf Center, the Working Circle Proactive Stewardship program is a unifying, community-based program comprised of local livestock producers and experts in wolf/livestock conflict. The common goal of everyone involved is to prevent and reduce wolf-livestock conflict by merging ranchers’ knowledge of their land, livestock and grazing experience with large carnivore biology and behavior. This comprehensive approach also brings additional benefits to ranching operations, wildlife and the land through responsible and ethical stockmanship, progressive grazing strategies and awareness of the environment.

Craig Miller

Craig is Defenders’ Senior Southwest Representative and has led Defenders’ regional wolf and jaguar conservation programs since 1993. He has served on the federal recovery teams for the cactus-ferruginous pygmy-owl and the gray wolf/southwest distinct population segment. He currently oversees a coexistence program in Arizona and New Mexico which employs range-riders and conflict reduction tools and techniques to assist with wolf recovery efforts. He serves on the Mexican Wolf-Livestock Council by appointment from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Craig has been active in Southwest conservation issues since 1987. Areas of Expertise: Southwest conservation issues, species recovery, landowner relations and incentives, predator

An Evening with Nate Blakeslee, Author, American Wolf

April 19, 6:00 – 9:00 pm

At Poco Diablo Resort

Presentation:  6:00 – 7:00pm

VIP Cocktail Event: 7:00 – 9:00pm

General Admission: $40 includes book & presentation. Books can be purchased online before the event and will be available for pick up at Wolf Week.

VIP Admission: $65 includes the book, presentation, VIP cocktail event and book signing.

Before men ruled the Earth, there were wolves. Once abundant in North America, these majestic creatures were hunted to near extinction by the 1920s. But in recent decades, conservationists have brought wolves back to the Rockies, igniting a battle over the very soul of the West. Award-winning author Nate Blakeslee tells the gripping story of one of these wolves, a charismatic alpha female named O-Six, in his poignant book AMERICAN WOLF: A True Story of Survival and Obsession in the West. Days after Crown acquired the book, Leonardo DiCaprio’s Appian Way Productions picked up the rights, with Scott Cooper (Black Mass) set to direct.

More than four million people visit Yellowstone each year, and wolves are one of the main attractions. Wolf advocates would like to see them remain on the endangered species list; opponents, especially professional hunting guides (whose clients compete with wolves for the elk they both prize) and cattle ranchers (who have lost livestock to wolves), would like to see a wolf-hunting season so that their numbers can be reduced. AMERICAN WOLF is about these opposing forces, told through the lens of the life of one wolf, O-Six, whose own story became entangled in the political strife around her.

O-Six can arguably be called one of the most famous wild animals in our country. She was one of the most visible wolves in Yellowstone at a time when wolf-watching became a common pastime in the park. Beloved by wolf-watchers, particularly Yellowstone park ranger Rick McIntyre and former schoolteacher Laurie Lyman, both featured in the book, O-Six becomes something of a social media star, with followers around the world. But as she raises her pups and protects her pack, O-Six is challenged on all fronts: by hunters and their professional guides; by cattle ranchers who are losing livestock and have the ear of politicians; and by other Yellowstone wolves who challenge her dominance of the stunningly beautiful Lamar Valley in the park’s mountainous Northern Range.

Nate Blakeslee became fascinated with wolves in the winter of 2008, after taking a wolf-watching class in Yellowstone. This is where he saw wolves in the wild for the first time. Drawing on interviews with McIntyre, and Lyman’s extensive wolf-watching diary (over 800,000 words), Blakeslee has re-created the true life story of a wild animal in unprecedented detail.

About the Author: Nate Blakeslee is a writer-at-large for Texas Monthly. His first book, Tulia, was a finalist for the PEN/Martha Albrand Award and won the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, the Texas Institute of Letters nonfiction award, and was named a New York Times Notable Book of 2005. The Washington Post called it one of the most important books about wrongful convictions ever written. He lives in Austin, Texas, with his family.

• copy of the book and VIP reception / book signing. Register here.

• Children’s workshop where kids can learn more about wolves and how they are like families, storytelling and interaction with the Apex Ambassador Pack. Register here.

• Predator Friendly®Fundraising Dinner with Carter Niemeyer. Carter was integral to the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone. Carter will entertain you with how he went from a wolf trapper and hunter to becoming one of their most vocal advocates while you enjoy a meal using ingredients from Predator Friendly® farms and ranchers. Register here.

• Wolf Socials with the Apex Ambassador Pack are a once in a lifetime experience and the money raised helps fund the pack’s daily care. Register here.

• Philip Folsom workshop – Wolf Tribe Transformation Program. Register here.

• Films at the Mary D. Fisher are sold separately by the theatre and can be purchased at the door or online at www.SedonaFilmFest.org.

Please note schedule subject to change. The new dates for 2018 are April 17-21st as the event previously scheduled on the 22nd has been postponed.

The following is Sedona Wolf Week 2018 schedule

Tuesday, April 17

Mary D Fisher Theatre

4:00 PM

Children’s Film: Alpha & Omega + Q&A with Apex Ambassador Pack

7:00 PM

Film: The Right To Be Wild + Q&A with Apex Ambassador Pack

Wednesday, April 18

Poco Diablo Resort

9:00-9:30AM

Registration

9:30-10:30AM

Opening Ceremony

10:30-10:45AM

Break

10:45-11:30AM

Speaker: Plan B to Save Wolves

11:30AM-12:20PM

Speaker: Carter Neimeyer – The Truth Behind Wildlife Services

12:30-1:15PM

Lunch

1:15-2:15PM

Speaker: Craig Miller – Defenders of Wildlife

2:15-3:15PM

I AM WOLF NATION – official launch

3:15-3:30PM

Break

3:30-5:30PM

Meet The Pack

Mary D Fisher Theatre

4:00PM

Film: The War In-Between + Q&A with Apex Ambassador Pack

7:00PM

Film: The War In-Between + Q&A with Apex Ambassador Pack

Thursday, April 19

Poco Diablo Resort

9:00-9:30AM

Registration

9:30-10:30AM

Speaker: Rachel Tilseth – Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin

10:30-11:30AM

Speaker: KC York – Trap Free Montana

11:30AM-12:30PM

Speaker: Marc Cooke – Wolves of the Rockies

12:30-1:30PM

LUNCH

1:30-2:30 PM

Speaker: Apex Protection Project

2:45-5:00PM

Meet The Pack with Special Appearance by Nate Blakeslee

5:00-5:30PM

Break

5:30-6:00PM

Registration – An Evening with Nate Blakeslee, Author of American Wolf

6:00-7:00PM

An Evening with Nate Blakeslee, Author of American Wolf

7:00-9:00PM

VIP Cocktail Reception & Book Signing with Nate Blakeslee

Friday, April 20 – Co-Existence Day – Speakers + Workshop

Poco Diablo Resort

8:30-9:15AM

Registration

9:15-9:30AM

Opening Remarks/Goals for Day

9:30-10:00AM

Kevin McFee, Rancher, Arizona Department of Agriculture

10:00-10:30AM

Joe Englehart, Rancher, The Working Circle Collaborative

10:30-11:00AM

Carol Bogezi, Wildlife Science Researcher

11:00-11:15AM

Break

11:15-11:45AM

Karin Vardaman member of The Working Circle Collaborative

11:45AM-12:15PM

Mark Coats, Rancher, Rancher Predator Awareness

12:15-12:45PM

Carter Niemeyer, Formerly of the Dept. of U.S. Fish & Wildlife

12:45-1:15PM

Shane Stevenson, Co-Existence Contractor, Rancher

1:15-2:00PM

Lunch

2:00-2:30PM

Craig Miller, Defenders of Wildlife

2:30-5:30PM

Co-Existence Speakers, Panel & Workshop

5:30-7:30PM

Happy Hour with Panelists

Saturday, April 21

Poco Diablo Resort

9:30-10:00AM

Registration

10:00AM-1:00PM

Wolf Tribe Corporate Team Building

10:00AM-12:00PM

Children’s Wolf Program

6:00-9:00PM

Predator Friendly Fundraiser

W.O.L.F. Announces New Features, Chapter, International website and General Membership. PLEASE READ!!!

April 2 at 12:50pm · From the W.O.L.F. website.

The World of Lupines Foundation (W.O.L.F.) is excited to announce the advent of several new features: the official launch of our North American chapter; the new international website; additional resources and benefits for our membership; and, for the first time in history of the foundation, W.O.L.F. is offering a general membership option for wolfdog owners and enthusiasts.

W.O.L.F.’s goals are to provide an educational and support network for wolfdog owners, supporters and breeders around the world and to run a global registration service for ethically produced Lupine Dogs. In order to best meet these goals and adhere to the needs of our ever expanding international membership, W.O.L.F. has added localised support services under our ‘zone’ pages on our new website. The website serves as a core information provider about our worldwide organisation, Lupine Dog registration, and provides access to local resources for our North American zone division and our first German language resource page for Continental Europe.

We are please to introduce our new ‘Lupine Classification’ system. This detailed system enables prospective owners to find the Lupine Dog that best matches their lifestyle and environment, whilst also providing our Lupine Dog breeders the opportunity to follow their breeding goals yet remain united under W.O.L.F.’s ethical and responsible breeding practices. You can find more information about the Lupine Classification system and breeder registration on our website.

W.O.L.F. is pleased to announce that we have aligned ourselves with companies such as Embark and other canine retailers around the world to provide our members special discounts on products and services. We have also included a ‘members area’ on our website that is available exclusively to our membership. The ‘members area’ contains our growing database of Lupine Dog information, resources, educational material, and details of member only special offers and events.

W.O.L.F. is looking forward to the summer season and will be kicking off with a series of Education Team appearances at the ‘All About Dogs’ show in the UK this month. Additionally, W.O.L.F. will hold our very first North American show and educational seminar over Labor Day weekend at the Full Moon Farm ‘Pawty’. We hope you will come along and support us in actively promoting a responsible attitude towards Lupine Dog ownership.

To become a member of W.O.L.F., follow the link to their website and click on the ‘membership’ tab at the top. W.O.L.F. wishes you all a fantastic summer season and looks forward to meeting you at their scheduled events. You can find details of W.O.L.F. appearances under ‘News & Events’.

Best wishes
The W.O.L.F. Committee
‘The Lupine Dog: the dog, as nature intended.”

https://www.paypal.me/WorldOfLupines