WDR Presents: A Wolf Called Romeo

WolfDog Radio was proud to have on our show author and friend – Nick Jans.  This is the man who knew and loved Romeo.  I could go on and on..but here him read from his book “A Wolf Called Romeo” and here the story from his own mouth.

ROMEO

I would like share with you an excerpt from a letter Nick Jans wrote to us:
“”I’m currently up in Ambler, my Arctic Eskimo village home of many years, and still my heart. Saw a wild black wolf trotting up a riverbank ablaze with yellow willow, and watched him a long time. Of course it was him. Always is.”

 

 

Romeo is on exhibit now….here are some photos from the exhibit:

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Pictures of Romeo:

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When love of Wolfdogs becomes blind…. by George Stapleton

This is disturbing and something I have been working on since August 2017, this should never happen…I post this on my timeline and here on Wolfdog Radio because I own what i say and do. There are others trying to help, pm me in Facebook if you think you can help us.

This post is about a dire situation for Wolfdogs in Cherokee County Texas and may be one of the hardest things I have ever had to do

Let me tell you what we experienced.nothing could have prepared me for what I saw and felt at Lynn Savages place. For years I had heard the stories, going back to the mid 90s about how bad it was out there. I never took much stock in it and assumed others would deal with whatever was going on out there if there were a need. I mean how bad could it be? Little did I know. I was approached by some folks in July of last year and they wanted my help placing Lynns animals. It was never going to be that simple and it still is by no means, that simple. They sent me pics and told me their experiences and I said I would help and even tried to get out there but could not at the time. Fast forward to the end of August and I was getting ready to go to the Pawty at FMF and I get a call. Jimmy Mantel has become a very good friend of mine and this is what has happened to us, others were involved initially, and they can say who they are if they want. Jimmy calls me and says, Lynn has had a stroke and now the need to place her animals is urgent. The reason the animals needed placement goes way beyond Lynn having a stroke, the neglect and abuse I saw was systemic and comes from years of those behaviors.

Enclosures knee deep with bones and feces as well as some puppy skeletons, containments that are hardly standing, water green with weeks of algae, canines with so many fleas and ticks on them that one died. Dead canines in trash cans, and canines that died years ago in no longer working freezers. Pretty much the worst situation that an animal could have to endure. Some of this may have to do with Lynns choice of how to live, she is a hoarder, and, in my opinion, that is her choice. I saw everything that first trip and spent the better part of the 1st day feeding and cleaning water buckets and securing canines enclosures. I also did a physical assessment of each animal for rescue. At the time I had no idea where Jimmy and I were going to place them. Lynn had given Jimmy verbal permission to place the animals, she just had a stroke and knew it needed to happen. From the moment that Lynn went into the hospital, Jimmy drove 4 to 5 hours 3 times a week to feed and water Lynns animals. Those animals never ate so good and certainly by the end of 8 weeks of care he gave they did not look emaciated. Before then we had the 2nd trip planned, and we were brining out the folks from Wolf Connection in California and St. Francis Wolf Sanctuary in Texas to do their own assessments and help plan the rescue. The folks from those orgs spent a lot of time with us there and in the end agreed to take all the Wolfdogs. Jimmy and I had done it!! We found a place for all of them, USDA licensed facilities to boot, and they agreed to not make a shitshow in the press about it. Do you have any idea how hard that is? And then Lynn said we could not save them, something happened to her at the hospital and only Lynn can tell you what, then she was released back into living in her dog kennel. So that stopped us in our tracks.for the next couple of months we tried offering Lynn money, we begged and pleaded, we went to the USDA and the County Attorney and Deputy Sheriffs and no one could make Lynn give her animals up or take them. It is now puppy season and she has 3 breeding pairs and intends to sell them. Here is the deal; that is not going to happen.

I may not be able to save Lynns animals from the horrid place they are in, but I can damn well make sure everyone knows and does not buy from her. You want the proof, here are some pics. What do Jimmy and I want; we want you all to help Lynn understand the danger she is putting Wolfdogs, herself and her local community in; and to let us place her animals before something bad happens to her or the animals. Or you can find places for them, or you all can chip in and fix her enclosures and provide her an animal caretaker because even before the stroke she could not take care of her animals properly. For you old timers, it is time for this to end. For the new breed, please learn from our mistakes. We need to make sure that nothing like this ever happens again. You may ask who am I to pass judgement on Lynn Savage like this, all I can say is I am not the only one person that knows the truth. And I would never act on my own, not like this, not for something so serious. I have also been there and seen all of it, and I mean all of it as well as some others. I am worried about the Wolfdogs, how is she feeding them, does she change the water or just throw bleach in, what about the fact she cannot even get in the enclosures, what happens when puppies are born will they drown in the rain, how many Wolfdogs must die, what is it going to take for Lynn Savage to do the right thing?

Let these names burn into your brain as they have mine.Nootka and Sheeba, Ripley and Smokey, Ranger and Walks, and a very old girl with a broken leg or shoulder since at least August; Enya. I am haunted day and night by what I saw there, and it hurts my soul that Lynn will not see the truth and let me help. No animal should have to live like that and I am tired of knowing about it and being unable to save them.please help us, please help Jimmy and I save these animals.

Replay: Wolfdog Radio Presents – Introduction to the Saarloos Wolfdog with Gerrie Pols and Julie Miyax Bradshaw – 01-30-2018 at 9:00

Due to technical difficulties, portions of the country and other parts of the world were unable to listen to our broadcast, therefore Wolfdog Radio is replaying this most important episode regarding the Saarloos Wolfdog!

Wolfdog Radio is pleased to present an “Introduction to the Saarloos” Wolfdog!  

LISTEN NOW

    Leendert Saarloos (1884-1969) born and raised in Dordrecht (the Netherlands) was a lover of the German Shepherd Dog.  In the 1930’s, he linked a German Sheppard to a she wolf to regain the natural characteristics in this breed. These wolf-dog crossings were called European Wolf dogs. At the end of the 1950s some of these dogs were trained as guidance for blind people. “

 

We are honored to be interviewing Gerrie Pols and Julie Miyax Bradshaw, both involved with Saarloos wolfdogs:   

Gerrie Pols is chairperson of the AVLS Dutch Breed Club of Saarloos Wolfdogs.

“It’s like Saarloos can put a spell on you, that makes you fall in love with them”

http://avls.nl/homepage/
https://silva-amica-saarlooswolfhonden.blogspot.nl/

Julie Miyax Bradshaw, founder and chair of the SWDC (Saarloos Wolfdog Club UK).
“At that time, I was a breeder of Lupine Dogs exclusively…a type of companion wolfdog which encompasses all ethically bred wolflike and wolfdogs. I fell in love with the Saarloos breed!”
http://www.miyax.co.uk/author/julie/

 

Both women continue down a path with an animal that is fiercely disputed, controversial and more rewarding when a bond is forged. Both women have allowed our Wolfdog Radio audience to join them briefly on their journey. 

and of course….the Saarloos…

LISTEN NOW!

Join us Tuesday January 30, 2018 at 9:00 P.M. (EST). 

Mushed from Alaska to Chicago World’s Fair in 1932-33 w/ 7 wolfdogs plus 2 dogs.

Ray Bonnell, sketches of Alaska.  Daily News Miner

http://www.newsminer.com/features/sundays/sketches_of_alaska/slim-williams-alaska-s-mushing-highway-ambassador-to-the-lower/article_475d81d6-f8bc-11e7-a378-639b54767be8.html

Adventurer Clyde “Slim” Williams moved to Alaska in 1900. According to his biography, “Alaska Sourdough,” Slim lived in the Copper River Basin in the 1930s, and one fall, while buying supplies at Copper Center, heard rumors of a Nome musher’s plan to drive a dog team from Alaska to the 1933-34 Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago.

Slim responded that his team of wolf-dog hybrids was the only one with the stamina and strength to make that trip. After a little goading, He agreed to attempt it (probably thinking that nothing would come of his bluster).

Slim’s boast became newspaper headlines, and the Alaska Road Commission’s Donald MacDonald contacted him. MacDonald was an ardent supporter of building a road from Alaska to the contiguous U.S. He believed Slim’s journey would be great publicity for the project. With MacDonald’s encouragement, Slim agreed to make the trip.

On Nov. 21, 1932, Slim left Copper Center with a loaded sled and a team of seven wolf-dog hybrids and two dogs. One dog died in the Yukon, but the other was Slim’s leader, a MacKenzie huskie named Rembrandt, who guided the team all the way to Chicago and then Washington, D.C.

Slim’s first destination was Dawson. From there, he followed the old Dominion Government Telegraph route through Whitehorse, Atlin and Telegraph Creek on his way to Hazelton in central British Columbia to connect with the continental road system.

At Carcross, southeast of Whitehorse, Slim modified his sled. Twenty-two inches wide with runners, his sled was fine for packed trails. However, from Carcross onward, he would be mostly breaking his own trail, and a sled with runners would founder. Slim discarded the runners, narrowed the sled to 16 inches (the width of a pair of snowshoes) and fitted it with a toboggan bottom so it would float over deep snow.

Slim then set off for the settlement of Telegraph Creek, at the head of navigation on the Stikine River in British Columbia. As far as Carcross, Slim had shared the hospitality of Athabascan Indians and westerners living in the region. From Carcross to Telegraph Creek visits with people were less frequent, but from Telegraph Creek to Hazelton he was alone, breaking trail for hundreds of miles along what would later become the southern corridor of the Cassiar Highway.

Slim reached the road system in BC just before breakup, and as winter warmed into spring, was forced to again modify his sled. This time, with a blacksmith’s assistance, he attached axles and a set of Model T wheels.

With wheels in place, he and his team crossed into the U.S., and continued toward Chicago. As spring turned towards summer, he switched to traveling at night to keep his team cool. Slim worried about his rig being seen in the dark, but was assured by a passing motorist that the light from headlights reflected in 16 canine eyes gyrating along the side of the road was enough to force any driver to proceed cautiously.

Slim finally arrived in Chicago on Sept. 16, 1933, almost 10 months after leaving Copper Center. After a short stay, he drove his dogs on to Washington, D.C. to meet with government representatives, including President Roosevelt. He then returned to Chicago for the duration of the Century of Progress Exposition as part of the Alaska exhibit. Helen Hegener’s book, “Alaska Sled Dog Tales,” states that Slim’s dogteam traversed more than 5,600 miles during its odyssey.

Later, Slim toured the United States as a public speaker. In 1939, he repeated his Alaska-Lower 48 adventure — this time via motorcycle. His sled, minus its wheels, is now on exhibit at the Knik Museum, south of Wasilla.

Ray Bonnell is a freelance artist, writer and longtime Fairbanks resident.

Wolfdog Radio Presents – Introduction to the Saarloos Wolfdog with Gerrie Pols and Julie Miyax Bradshaw

Wolfdog Radio is pleased to present an “Introduction to the Saarloos” Wolfdog!  

LISTEN NOW – CLICK PLAY

    Leendert Saarloos (1884-1969) born and raised in Dordrecht (the Netherlands) was a lover of the German Shepherd Dog.  In the 1930’s, he linked a German Sheppard to a she wolf to regain the natural characteristics in this breed. These wolf-dog crossings were called European Wolf dogs. At the end of the 1950s some of these dogs were trained as guidance for blind people. “

 

We are honored to be interviewing Gerrie Pols and Julie Miyax Bradshaw, both involved with Saarloos wolfdogs:   

Gerrie Pols is chairperson of the AVLS Dutch Breed Club of Saarloos Wolfdogs.

“It’s like Saarloos can put a spell on you, that makes you fall in love with them”

http://avls.nl/homepage/
https://silva-amica-saarlooswolfhonden.blogspot.nl/

Julie Miyax Bradshaw, founder and chair of the SWDC (Saarloos Wolfdog Club UK).
“At that time, I was a breeder of Lupine Dogs exclusively…a type of companion wolfdog which encompasses all ethically bred wolflike and wolfdogs. I fell in love with the Saarloos breed!”
http://www.miyax.co.uk/author/julie/

 

Both women continue down a path with an animal that is fiercely disputed, controversial and more rewarding when a bond is forged. Both women have allowed our Wolfdog Radio audience to join them briefly on their journey. 

and of course….the Saarloos…

LISTEN NOW!

Join us Tuesday January 16, 2018 at 9:00 P.M. (EST). 

Yamnuska Sanctury is a Winning Charity for 2018 Benefit Brews from Phillips

http://www.canadianbeernews.com/2017/12/05/phillips-announces-winning-charities-for-2018-benefit-brews/

Phillips Brewing has announced the two winning organizations – one in British Columbia and one in Alberta – that will receive the proceeds from the brewery’s Benefit Brew 2018 project.

Based on an online vote, this year’s supported charities will be BC SPCA Wild ARC, “a wildlife rehabilitation centre providing care for more than 3,000 injured, orphaned and sick animals each year”; and Alberta’s Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary, “a non-profit organization that promotes responsible wolfdog ownership and provides safe sanctuary for wolfdogs that have been neglected, abandoned, or otherwise displaced.”

Phillips will be brewing BC SPCA Wild ARC Honey IPA and Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctuary West Coast ESB soon, and will release them in early February exclusively in their respective provinces.

Each organization will receive full proceeds from the sales of the beers – roughly $10,000 each – and Phillips will also be donating $500 to all of the other finalists that were on the shortlist of Benefit Brew 2018 nominees.  CONGRATULATIONS, Yamnuska Wolfdog Sanctury!!!!!!!!!!!!

APEX Fundraiser and Screening of “Gray Area” Wednesday, December 6th, 5pm.

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https://www.flipcause.com/secure/cause_pdetails/MjUzNTk=

Please support this most worthwhile function Hosted by APEX Protection Projects and Malibu Wines.  Meet the APEX Pack and assist Paula Ficara and Steve Wastell in their yearly fundraising efforts for all that they do for the animals thru their projects and programs designed thru APEX Protection Projects.